Archives & Collections

​​In addition to our over 30,000 artifacts, we also have a significant collection of archives and records.  Our collection includes cemetery records, church records, Conneaut Lake Breeze, Conneaut Lake Park, family histories, military records, and school records.  Please feel free to contact us if you'd like to learn more about these collections and how they can help you!

Cemetery Records
Conneaut Lake Area Historical Society serves the Conneaut Lake Borough and adjacent townships. We have numerous cemeteries within Greenwood, Summit and Sadsbury townships.


While we are gathering records for all the cemeteries in the area, we currently have the records for:


AndersonBarberDickson
EvergreenGenevaGreenfield
GreenwoodHazelHood
LoperMcMichelMcQuiston
Old GenevaPetersonSmith
UnionWilliams 1Williams 2



Crawford County Historical Society has records dating back to 1960s, but they are available only by going to the society’s office on Chestnut Street, Meadville. That society also is preparing a GPS program for all the county’s cemeteries to allow people to access the locations of the cemeteries and directions on how to get to the cemeteries.

Many cemeteries are family-owned and have only a small number of burials recorded in them.

Below are the names of cemeteries provided by the county historical society.

Greenwood Township
Anderson
Axel Farm
Bradley Farm-Dickson
Caldwell
Dickson-Bradley
Geneva Methodist
Geneva (old) – only 10 people buried in this cemetery.
Greenfield (Porter’s Corners)
Greenwood Memorial
Hazen (only two burials. It is listed as abandoned).
Hood
Loper
McMichael
McQuiston (only one burial listed).
Peterson
Smith (only four burials listed).
Williams #1
Williams #2 (Southwest with only nine burials listed.)

Sadsbury Township
Adsit
Barber-Stratton (now under the direction of the historical society. See separate link.)
Blakely
Conneaut Lake Memorial Park (Civil War)
Garwood (Jackson) Thirty-one burials are listed.
Hughes (Twenty six or seven burials listed)
Humes-Coulter
Lakeview
Memorial Park
Potter (only one burial). Located on route 20016, south of Conneaut Lake.
Smiley
Southside (Foust) Shermansville
Stratton-Barber
Sunnyside (Fifteen burials). Located on Route 485 at the rear of the Sunnyside Mennonite Church.

Summit Township
Evergreen (at Harmonsburg).
Foust (east side of Conneaut Lake).
Gehr-Oakhill on Gehrton Road
Iamaculate Conception (Chestnut Corners)
Luper (only 11 burials. Located about one and one-miles from Harmonsburg.)
McClure (Once the Chestnut Corners).
McCurdy
Oakwood-Gehr
Union (old Harmonsburg Cemetery near Whiteside).
Whiting #1 (abandoned, only 12 burials).
Whiting #2 (On Whiting farm, only 17 burials).
Yorty – On Route 6 between Linesville and Conneaut Lake, private cemetery on James McNutt farm).
Oakhill (Gehrton) Route 402, one-half mile south of Route 20045.


Church Records
Church records are an important part of any community. 

We only have a few actual church records, but we have many pieces of church histories – including pictures, programs of special events, hymn books, commemorative plates and other artifacts which reflect the spiritual growth of the community.

Pictures and histories of each church are documented in the church exhibit, but we also have information in the research archives which tell the deeper story of our church histories.

 
Conneaut Lake Breeze
For more than 60 years, Conneaut Lake was served with its own newspaper – The Conneaut Lake Breeze – published weekly.

When the historical society was formed Joanne Scaduto and Jerry Sidner donated more than $2,500 in memory of their grandfather, who was the editor, to have the papers transferred to microfilm.

The society has all the copies on microfilm. Through the efforts of Rep. John Evans, a $5,000 grant was secured to purchase a microfilm reader and printer. It is in our office and allows quick access to the paper and the ability to print an article from the paper.

Years on microfilm are from 1920 to 1980s when the paper ceased operation.

In addition, the Shontz Memorial Library donated hard copies of all the papers, so they too are available.


Conneaut Lake Park
One of the highlights of our museum is hundreds of artifacts from Conneaut Lake Park and this includes its early years when it was known as Exposition Park.

Pictures from every era are displayed in the Conneaut Lake Park exhibit and also archived in our research books.

Look closely at some of the pictures and you can find a very young Perry Como & Doris Day who both got their start at Conneaut Lake Park.  Sports figures, including world champion boxer Max Schmeling are  also pictured.

Many museum visitors have been thrilled to find pictures of themselves or their ancestors on our wall!

But it’s not just pictures that bring back the memories though.  We have an old taffy box used to ship taffy made here and the museum exhibit also includes an old game and a player piano that was once part of the old shooting gallery.

Souvenirs of every description, postcards, and other pieces of memorabilia from either Exposition Park or Conneaut Lake Park are part of the wonderful memories that we can all share.

The original blueprints for Hotel Conneaut are just part of the treasures from the historical hotel.  A chandelier wheel was part of the Crystal Ballroom and now provides some of the light in the museum.  We also have a waste can and a silver tea service from the hotel.

The original showcase which once held posters advertising upcoming events at Dreamland Ballroom now holds souvenir posters from days gone by.  Photos and video of the fire which destroyed the ballroom are also displayed.

Postcards also are included in the exhibit which give visitors a glimpse into the golden age of the Park and reminds us of why the Park remains a treasure.

Our research room also includes a chronological review of the Park which can be used to understand what has happened in the past at Conneaut Lake Park.

Fairyland Forest, which was part of the Park for many years, also has a major part in our museum with dozens of pictures and other memorabilia.  They remind us of the charm of the fantasy that thrilled kids and adults alike.



Family Histories
Looking up your family history can be fun – and challenging.

Our museum office is also a research center with some family histories already completed. These, coupled with our personal and military histories, are an important source in completing your family’s history.

Microfilm of all the Conneaut Lake Breeze papers can also be used to track down names, places, and dates of your ancestors.  The research room also includes some Conneaut lake directories with the residents’ names and where they lived.

We can’t promise that we can completely fill in your family’s history, but our materials will help you in most cases.

We’d also welcome copies of family histories and other information – so that the next generation can track down the family history easier!

We also have some cookbooks with recipes from local residents – we may even have that elusive recipe that you’ve been trying to find.

Family members may also be included in school class pictures and other material in our files.

The history of families is important and we do all we can to trace their paths and see the footsteps that they left on our community and your life!

Military  Records
Our society has a number of military records of veterans who served from our area. We also have a display in the museum featuring veterans in their uniforms with the years of service.

We don’t have a huge number of complete records, but have some available from information gleaned through research and from information provided from families.

All of these are available at the museum for those wanting to do research.

We welcome donations of pictures and information about area veterans.

Schools 
Class pictures and diplomas of all sizes are just a few of the many reminders of school days in Conneaut Lake and the areas on display at the museum.

We encourage visitors to identify class members and how they looked as school children.

Book, lunch boxes, desks and even the bell chimes used by Mr. Nelson to bring classes to attention are just a few of the special archives as we trace the history of education – from one-room schools to the consolidated schools of today.

We even have bricks from the old Conneaut Lake High School which now serves as the elementary school!​